Archive for the 'Food Safety and Food Warnings' Category

Recipe: PRODUCT TAMPERING ?? PLEASE READ…

|June 2, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

I usually purchase a box or two of instant potatoes that I can use for thickening soups, etc.

Well – I purchased 2 boxes of Great Value Instant Potatoes from WALMART –

UPC #007874237106

The codes embedded in white on the white box at the top:

17:55 FR BEST BY 08 25 11

that's it! That is all the info.

Anyway – the boxes were not slit, cut, bent or opened in anyway.

When I got home, after putting everything away, I opened the box tops to pour the flakes in my container. Many times these bags in cereal boxes, etc. stick to the bottom of the box because of the glue. These bags from both boxes came out very easily. At the same time I was reaching for my kitchen shears to cut the bag open and unknown to me – one side of the bag was slit completely down the side. Potato flakes all over the counter, floor, cupboards, etc. Ok – things happen. so I cleaned the mess and emptied the bag through the slit – I never cut the bag open at the top. At first I didn't think anything of it. When I opened the second bag – same thing. And, being stupid – I poured through the slit into my potato container.

Then the light bulb went off – how the hell did they get this in the box if it was slit like that?

I immediately contacted WalMart with an email. Next day I got a call from the store I purchased it in. The manager called and we discussed this – DO NOT USE THEM. Bring them back.

I saved the boxes, and the slit bags and the flakes were in my potato container. Next day I packed my potato container and the boxes with the bags inside of them and took them to the store with my receipt, which of course I was gypped on something else and when I brougt it to the cashier's attention she said it was "close enough" – and I just let it go.

The manager dumped my flakes in a bag, returned my container to me, took care of the cashier's "close enough", and exchanged the boxes for me.

First thing I did was open the boxes in front of the manager and pull the bags out – no slits, no cuts – everything was fine. But these boxes have different numbers/codes on them.

So if you purchased Great Value Instant Potato Flakes with those codes embedded on the top flap of the box – check to make sure your bags are not split anywhere.

17:55 FR BEST BY 08 25 11

I did notice after I came home and washed my container out and filled it again – that the flakes from the new boxes looked better than the ones in the other boxes.

Just wanted to pass this along – just in case…..,

Recipe: Health Article – Please Read

|June 1, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

This article was posted in "Dear Abby". I would like to share it with you.

OLD PANCAKES CAUSE HEALTH REACTION

Dear Abby: I recently made a batch of pancakes for my healthy 14-year old son, using a mix that was in our pantry. He said they tasted "funny" but ate them anyway. About 10 minutes later, he began having difficulty breathing and his lips began turning purple. I gave him his allergy pill, had him sit on the sofa and told him to relax. He was wheezing while inhaling and exhaling.

My husband, a volunteer firefighter and EMT, heated up some water, and we had my son lean over the water so the steam could clear his chest and sinuses. Soon, his breathing became more regular and his lips returned to a more normal color.

We checked the date on the box of pancake mix and, to my dismay, found it was very outdated. As a reference librarian at an academic institution, I have the ability to search through many research databases. I did just that, and found an article the next day that mentioned a 19-year old male DYING after eating pancakes made with outdated mix. Apparently, the mold that forms in old pancake mix can be toxic!

When we told our friends about my son's close call, we were surprised at the number of people who mentioned they should check their own pancake mix since they don't use it that often, or had purchased it some time ago. With so many people shopping at warehouse-type stores and buying large sizes of pancake mix, I hope your readers will take the time to check the expiration date on their boxes.

—Sue in Wyantskill, NY

Dear Sue: Thank you for the warning. I certainly was not aware that pancake mix can turn moldy and cause and allergic reaction in someone with an allergy to mold – but it's logical. I wonder if the same holds true for cake mix, brownie mix and ookie mix. If so, then a warning should be placed on the box for people like me.

We hear so often about discarding prescription and over-the-counter medications after their expiration dates, but I don't recall warnings about packaged items in the pantry. Head up folks!

from my files:

Baking powder – store no more than 18 months

Baking soda – store no more than 2 years

Biscuit, brownie and muffin mixes – store no more than 9 months

Bouillon products – store no more than 12 months

Bread crumbs, croutons – store not more than 6 months

Cake mixes – store no more than 6 to 9 months

Casserole mix – store not more than 9 to 12 months

Cereals – ready to eat – store no more than 12 months

Chili powder – store no more than 6 months

Cocoa mixes – store no more than 8 months

Cornmeal – store no more than 12 months

Cornstarch – store no more than 18 months

Dried pasta – store no more than 2 years

Dry milk – store no more than 12 months

Canned frosting – store no more than 3 months

Frosting mixes – store no more than 8 months

Flour – cake, all purpose – store for no more than 12 months

Herbs – store no longer than 6 months

Spice blends – store 2 years unopened, no more than 12 months opened

Ground spices – store no more than 6 months

Whole spices – store 1 to 2 years

Gelatin – store no more than 18 months

Hot Roll mix – store no more than 18 months

Instant breakfast products – store no more than 6 months

Pancake and piecrust mixes – store no more than 6 months

Parmesan grated cheese – 10 months unopened, 2 months opened

Pectin – store no more than 12 months

Rice, brown – store no more than 6 months

Rice, white – store no more than 12 months

Sugar, brown – store no more than 4 months

Sugar, confectioners' – store no more than 18 months

Sugar, granulated – store no more than 2 years

Artificial sweeteners – store no more than 2 years

Tea bags – store no more than 18 months

Tea, instant – store no more than 2 years

Toaster pastries – store no more than 3 months

Sauce and gravy mixes – store no more than 6 months

Soup mixes – store not more than 12 months

Whipped topping, dry – store no more than 1 year

I have a habit of "dating" pantry items when purchased, crossing out the purchase date when opened for use and re-dating. All homemade mixes, canned and frozen foods (homemade/preserved) are always labeled and dated – especially when I make several batches spread out over a period of time. It was always done in the restaurants and I have continued to do it since.

And like I've said before – just because it has an expiration date on it – once the item is opened – you've got a good chance that it is not going to last that long! AND BACTERIA SETS IN!

When in doubt – TOSS IT!

It's not worth it's price if it is going to make you or a family member sick!