Archive for the 'How To' Category

Recipe: where oh where is the McRib????

|November 21, 2013|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

Well it's been a day!


And to make matters worse – McDonald's has announced that they are discontinuing the McRib!


 

Isn't it bad enough that the McRib is only available for a short period of time and not on the menu as a permanent item?


I was watching FOX News when I got the shocker.  Hell – this makes Michelle Obama happy – Miss (cough) Perfect who thinks she can control what everyone is supposed to eat.  Who the hell is that bitch!  I bet you anything that old witch is a junk food closet eater and doesn't want anyone to know!  How else did her ass get so big?

 

Anyway – so what's a McRib anyway?


McDonald's McRib sandwich, pressed formed boneless pork patty submerged in barbecue sauce, with onion and pickles on a sandwhich bun is a specialty item that has made more appearances on their menu than I can recall.


Just what exactly is a pressed formed pork patty?

 

Rather than make your own pressed pork product you can use JTM® Brand pressed formed pork patties, which McDonald's used. Wal-Mart had them in the frozen meat section, not sure if they still carry them. If you're looking for a vegeterian version, check out Gardenburgers® Meatless Riblets.

 

The McRib


1 JTM® Brand "Grillin' Ribs" pork patty
1 6 inch long sandwich bun
2 tablespoons Bullseye® Barbecue sauce
1 tablespoon chopped white onion
3 sour dill pickle slices

Preheat griddle to 400°. Cook the pork patty according to the package
directions.

Toast both halves of the bun. On the toasted top bun, apply the barbecue
sauce and the dill pickle slices, placed evenly across the bun.

Put the cooked rib patty on top of the picle slices and follow with the
onions. Place the bottom bun on the onions.

Wrap sandwich in a 12”x16” sheet of waxed paper, let sit 5 minutes, then
microwave on high about 15 seconds, still wrapped. This will help create
that "McDonald's Flavor".

 

Okay cooks – let's do this – why not "know" exactly what you are eating and/or feeding your family like I do –

 

I started with thin sliced pork – no fat – a nice good cut of meat is best for what I make.  Place in a hot skillet (you know the routine – heat the skillet, add your olive oil, heat your oil, add your meat) and I season mine with Kosher salt, fresh cracked black pepper, garlic, onion powder and parsley.  Fried nice and a little on the slow side for that juicy tenderness we all love.  If you want to do them in the oven – same routine – olive oil, seasonings, a bit of water, cover, 350* until fork tender.

 

BBQ sauce – well – if  Bullseye is too spicy for you (or any other brand), cut it with some ketchup and if you want a bit of sweetness – give a drizzle of honey.  You can make your own as well – who said you couldn't?

 

A good hoagie-style roll, which we prefer to have very lightly toasted, fresh sliced onions and several dill pickle chips and you've got one heluva good McRib from your own kitchen.

 

No microwave needed (I wouldn't use one for anything anyway!)

 

Make them for a party, even use the crockpot to cook them in – so tender and juicy.  and you will also know what the hell you're eating!

 

C'mon – don't worry about the shape of the patty itself or the shape of the roll – it doesn't matter – it's a damn good sammie whether you make it in the oven, on the stove top or in the crockpot.

 

And – get this – make a ton of these patties – once cooked, cool completely in the fridge.  Next day, wrap them individually – easy to warm up at any time with BBQ sauce.  Well worth the effort!

 

Long live the McRib!

 

Food police – BITE ME!

 

 

Recipe: How to clean and peel mushrooms –

|April 29, 2012|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

Okay – everyone has their own opinions on washing mushrooms, cleaning mushrooms, peeling mushrooms and so on.

First of all, many say that if you were to wash mushrooms they would absorb the water and become soggy. Well, I for one wash EVERYTHING – including mushrooms. Cool running water with my mushrooms in a fine strainer and using my fingers to clean each one has never ruined anything I have made – so I continue to wash. I certaining do not SOAK them to give them a chance to absorb what little water they may absorb to begin with – considering they grow outside and there are rainstorms! (bathtub, Mr. Bubble and mushrooms! scrub-a-dub-dub – I don't think so) Transfer to paper towels and that's it – it's that simple.

Would I ever BRUSH my mushrooms clean? Never. My choice. Nor would I use a clean towel to rub the dirt off and right into the mushroom – once again – my opinion.

Now for the peeling part – do you HAVE to peel mushrooms?

NO.

But many times I do. Especially for stuffed mushrooms. If frying with onions and adding to gravy – why peel? To each his own.

After cleaning and patting my mushrooms dry, I simple press my finger into the stem (which by the way I first cut the very bottom of the stem off – habit – a little "trim". I press my finger into the stem to remove it. Once the stem is removed, I just grab on to that little ragged edge where the stem once was and peel away the top layer of the mushroom cap. So easy. It comes off in strips with no problems. And perfect for stuffing your mushroom caps! Makes them extra tender!

Happy peeling!

Recipe: Homemade Baker’s Coconut

|November 20, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

1 Coconut with lots of coconut water inside
1 1/3 Cup Fructose (or sugar)
1 1/4 Cup Coconut Water (from the coconut)

NOTE:
Choose a nice dark brown hard coconut that, when shaken, sounds like there is a lot of water inside.

 

1. First drain the coconut water to a cup. To do this, poke a large hole into one of the 3 "eyes" of the coconut. Make sure the hole is wide so that enough air can enter to pull out the water. Strain the water to remove any loose particles and set aside.

2. To crack open the coconut you can either throw it on the concrete floor (with this you risk hurting someone and losing pieces of coconut), or you can hammer it open with a regular hammer. Make sure that the coconut is placed on a very firm surface that you cannot damage like a sidewalk, the garage, or the entrance to your home. If you have never done this before, you may want to wear protective eye coverings to shield yourself from any flying particles of coconut shell.

3. Once the coconut is open, collect all the pieces and bring to your working surface. To remove the coconut flesh from the hard shell, use an old knife without a pointed edge (like a dinner knife) and pry the fresh apart from the shell. This can be done best by wedging as much of the knife between a loose part of the coconut and shell as possible and applying pressure to separate them.

4. Once all coconut has been freed from it’s shell, peel off the brown skin with a potato peeler. You can eat this or discard – your choice.

5. If you are using a food processor:
Break up the coconut into small enough pieces that you can fit them in your processor. Fit the processor with the shredding attachment and shred all the coconut.

5. If you using a manual mandolin or shredder:
Leave the coconut pieces as large as possible so they are easy to hold. Shred all the coconut.

My coconut gave me 4 cups of shredded coconut and 1 1/4 cup coconut water. Use what ever your coconut gives you. Just remember that the fructose amount should be 1/3 that of the coconut amount. So, if you end up with only 3 cups of shredded coconut, you will only need 1 cup of fructose.

6. To make the baker’s coconut:
In a medium-sized saucepan, place the coconut, coconut water, and fructose. Cook over medium heat until the fluids begin to boil, about 15 minutes. Turn the heat to low immediately and continue to cook, uncovered for 1 hour or until the fluids have reduced to syrup.

Remove from heat and place the coconut in a sieve to stain. Catch the syrup and use on desserts – it has a delicious flan coconut-caramel flavor.

Spread the coconut flakes out on a cookie sheet and let dry over night. Refrigerate or freeze if you will not be using immediately.

!!The coconut will not come out white because I don’t use a whitening agent like the store-bought baker’s coconut does!!

Recipe: Making Homemade Extracts

|November 20, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

 I received so many requests for this information – and I wish you would have contacted me sooner for these.

You may not be able to make all these before this holiday season – but if you are a baker – you will find that you can still make them now and you will then have them throughout the year.

By now, you know I am a "homemade" person – and I find that by making my own flavored extracts that my baked goods always have a better taste.  Did you ever buy a bottle of peppermint extract and have a really lousy taste in your finished product?  Fresh is always better.  You will have better results.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tired of paying high prices (which continually keep going up while the bottle sizes get smaller!) for your extracts and flavorings?

Of you are an "occasional" or "seasonal" baker that only pulls out the flour one or twice a year you probably don't mind paying for an extract. You may even share a bottle with others that don't bake as much. Not in my house. I need my extracts. And I have to watch my "inventory" of my homemade extracts, oils, flavored sugars, etc. to make sure I always have them on hand.

Save money – DIY! It's simple, it's easy, it's flavorful – and it's cheaper! More bang for your buck.

I don't add sugar to my citrus extracts – some do – it's your choice. The sugar is not needed as far as I am concerned.

Also – I feel that using colored bottles is better – keeps the sun out – which will effect your extracts/flavorings.

Be sure to sterilize your bottles and caps!

Opt for colored glass bottles when you can. Store out of sunlight in your pantry/cupboard.

Happy extract making!

 

How to Make Anise Extract

This takes a good three months to make – but it is worth it. and so simple!

Fill a small (half-pint) sterilized jar with whole star of anise. Carefully pour vodka over until it reaches the top. Cap. Store in pantry, shaking once a week for 3 months. If you want your anise flavoring to have a stronger flavor – allow to sit for 4 months before using.

When ready to use, strain into a clean, sterile jar, cap and store in your pantry.

 

How to Make Cinnamon Extract

Some will use a light rum – but I use my 80 proof vodka.

Break a couple cinnamon stick into a clean, sterilized jar;.

Pour 8 oz. vodka over sticks; cover; place in pantry.

Shake daily for 2 weeks.

When you have the flavor you are looking for, remove the cinnamon sticks. The longer they are in the jar, the stronger it will be, and you don't want it too overpowering.

Store in pantry.

 

How to Make Coconut Extract

1 coconut

1 1/2 ounces freshly grated coconut, approximately 1/3 cup

4 ounces vodka – 40 proof – some use 80 proof

To open a coconut: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Place the coconut onto a folded towel set down in a large bowl. Find the 3 eyes on 1 end of the coconut and using a nail or screwdriver and hammer or meat mallet, hammer holes into 2 of the eyes. Turn the coconut upside down over a container and drain the water from the coconut.

Store the water in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Place coconut on baking pan and bake in the oven for 15 minutes. Remove from oven. (The coconut should have cracked in several places.) Using an oyster knife or other dull blade, separate the hard shell from the brown husk. Using a serrated vegetable peeler, peel the brown husk from the coconut meat. Rinse the coconut meat under cool water and pat dry. Break the meat into 2 to 3-inch pieces. With the grater disk attached to a food processor, grate the coconut.

Place 1 1/2 ounces of coconut into a 1-cup glass jar with lid (sterilized) and pour vodka over it. Seal and shake to combine. Place in a cool dark place for 5 to 7 days, shaking to combine every day. Strain coconut and discard. Return vodka to a clean (sterilized) jar or to its original bottle and store in a cool place for up to a year. Reserve the remaining coconut for another use.

 

How to Make Lemon Extract

the zest from 1 – 2 lemons (wash and dry the lemon well, remove zest – no pith)

4 oz. vodka – 40 proof – some use 80 proof

1 teaspoon sugar – totally optional

Combine sugar and vodka in small stainless or glass saucepan and warm (do not boil) to dissolve sugar. Transfer to sterile jar; add lemon zest. Cap tightly and shake.

Place in pantry – shake daily. In a month you will have your extract.

NOTE: If not using sugar – place vodka and lemon zest in sterile bottle; cap; shake and proceed as above.

 

How to Make Orange Extract

the zest from 1 – 2 oranges (wash and dry the oranges well, remove zest – no pith)

4 oz. vodka – 40 proof – some use 80 proof

1 teaspoon sugar – totally optional

Combine sugar and vodka in small stainless or glass saucepan and warm (do not boil) to dissolve sugar. Transfer to sterile jar; add orange zest. Cap tightly and shake. (Make sure your strips of zest are completely immersed.)

Place in pantry – shake daily. In a month you will have your extract.

NOTE: If not using sugar – place vodka and orange zest in sterile bottle; cap; shake and proceed as above.

 

How to Make Lime Extract

the zest from 2 – 4 limes (wash and dry the limes well, remove zest – no pith)

4 oz. vodka – 40 proof – some use 80 proof

1 teaspoon sugar – totally optional

Combine sugar and vodka in small stainless or glass saucepan and warm (do not boil) to dissolve sugar. Transfer to sterile jar; add lime zest. Cap tightly and shake. (Make sure your strips of zest are completely immersed.)

Place in pantry – shake daily. In a month you will have your extract.

NOTE: If not using sugar – place vodka and lime zest in sterile bottle; cap; shake and proceed as above.

 

How to Make Grapefruit Extract

the zest from 1 – 2 grapefruit (wash and dry the grapefruit well, remove zest – no pith)

4 oz. vodka – 40 proof – some use 80 proof

1 teaspoon sugar – totally optional

Combine sugar and vodka in small stainless or glass saucepan and warm (do not boil) to dissolve sugar. Transfer to sterile jar; add grapefruit zest. Cap tightly and shake. (Make sure your strips of zest are completely immersed.)

Place in pantry – shake daily. In a month you will have your extract.

NOTE: If not using sugar – place vodka and grapefruit zest in sterile bottle; cap; shake and proceed as above.

 

How to Make Almond Extract

4 oz. almonds, peeled and blanched

2 cups vodka

Process almonds in food processor until fine – like raw sugar not white sugar.

Transfer to sterilized 1-quart glass jar; pour in vodka; cap tightly; store in pantry. Shake daily for 6 weeks.

After 6 weeks, straner through a coffee filter and transfer to small (sterilized) jars. Cap.

Takes time to make – but will keep indefinitely.

 

How to Make Vanilla Essence

This is more of a vanilla flavoring than an extract – milder – not as flavorful.

For this, I use vodka – some will use brandy, rum, gin, cognac or brandy – which to me changes the flavor completely and will effect the outcome of your baked goods. Vodka has the perfect flavor for true extracts.

3 vanilla beans, split to within 1/4-inch of each end

8 oz. 80 proof vodka

Place vanilla beans in sterilized glass jar and cover with vodka. Place in pantry; shake occasionally and let set for 2 months before using.

NOTE: ALSO – WHICH TO ME THIS IS IMPORTANT – since vanilla beans come in two different grades (A and B), I prefer to use the B grade. Grade B vanilla beans.


Grade B beans have less water weight. You get more bean for your buck because you're not paying for water. This also means that less water ends up in your extract.

With Grade A you pay for appearance, which doesn't matter.

We get the same beans as Grade A, but at a fraction of the cost.

 

How to Make Vanilla Extract

This is more flavorful than vanilla essense.

For this, I use vodka – some will use brandy, rum, gin, cognac or brandy – which to me changes the flavor completely and will effect the outcome of your baked goods. Vodka has the perfect flavor for true extracts.

6 vanilla beans, split to within 1/4-inch of each end (some remove the seeds, some don't)

8 oz. 80 proof vodka

Place vanilla beans in sterilized glass jar and cover with vodka. Place in pantry; shake occasionally and let set for 2 months before using.

NOTE: ALSO – WHICH TO ME THIS IS IMPORTANT – since vanilla beans come in two different grades (A and B), I prefer to use the B grade. Grade B vanilla beans.


Grade B beans have less water weight. You get more bean for your buck because you're not paying for water. This also means that less water ends up in your extract.

With Grade A you pay for appearance, which doesn't matter.

We get the same beans as Grade A, but at a fraction of the cost.

 

How to Make Peppermint Extract

This uses dried peppermint leaves.

Chop 1/4 cup peppermint leaves in your food processor or use a mortar and pestle. Transfer to sterilized glass jar.

Add 4 oz. vodka and 4 oz. filtered water. Cap and shake.

Store in pantry for 2 weeks before using. Remember to shake daily.

When ready to use, strain and transfer to clean, sterilized bottles; cap; store in pantry. Discard used leaves.

 

How to Make Peppermint Extract

This is for those that grow their own peppermint.

Clean (wash) your fresh cut peppermint springs. You will want to "bruise" them a bit with your fingers for the flavor. Place in sterile glass jar. About 5 or 6 small sprigs work well with 6 oz. vodka (3/4 cup). Be sure to cover the springs with the vodka. Cap and store in pantry.

After 2 weeks you wil have a mild peppermint flavor. Once it is the strength you want, strain and discard the sprigs of peppermint. Store in pantry.

 

So it's time to visit your local liquor store and stock up on 80 proof vodka!

Enjoy!

 

Recipe: It’s pomegranate season –

|October 9, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

And I absolutely love pomegranates!

I also make my own Pomegranate Syrup (Grenadine)

2 large pomegranates, seeded, about 2 cups seeds
1 1/2 cups sugar

Combine seeds and sugar in a non-aluminum saucepan; stir to mix, crushing well, until you have a wet mass. Cover and let stand 12 to 24 hours. Bring to a boil over moderate heat, stirring constantly. Lower heat and simmer 2 minutes. Strain out seeds, pressing down to extract juice. Pour into a hot sterilized jar. Cover with a piece of cloth or a clean towel until cooled. Cap tightly and refrigerate. Makes about 2 cups.

Recipe: Make your own Chorizo!

|October 9, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

If you need some chorizo for a recipe and don't have any on hand – you can make it in no time at all –

SIMPLE CHORIZO

1 lb. ground pork
1 clove garlic, minced
2 t. crushed red pepper
1 ½ t. cinnamon
1 ¼ t. salt
1 t. coriander
2 t. oregano

Will keep in fridge up to 3 days; freezes well for one month.

Recipe: Homemade herbed croutons

|October 9, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

You know how I am when it comes to making things homemade. This is a good recipe that can be made ahead and used for the holidays as well as a quick and easy way to make stuffing/dressing to go with chops, chicken, steaks, etc.

In my house – we love dressing. And I make it all year = not just at Thanksgiving.

These croutons will keep for 2 months, REFRIGERATED. Moisten each 8 cups with 1 cup broth before using.

1 lb. white or wheat bread, sliced, and cubed**
1/2 c. salad oil
1 t. salt
2 garlic cloves, minced separately
2 T. parsley flakes
2 T. onion flakes, crushed
1 t. sage
1/2 t. thyme
1/2 t. black pepper

Preheat oven to 350* F. Into a large bowl, combine bread cubes, salad oil, salt and 1 minced garlic clove. Arrange bread cubes onto 2 cookie sheets. Bake for 25 minutes, until light golden brown and crunchy. Mix together remaining minced garlic clove, parsley and onion flakes, sage, thyme and black pepper; mix in bread cubes. Cool for 20 minutes at room temperature, before transferring bread cubes into airtight containers and refrigerating.

**I've used a combination of breads and rolls including white, sour dough, French, Italian, grain, rye, etc. as well as any homemade breads that I make.

Recipe: Poached fish and court bouillon

|October 9, 2011|read comments (4)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

Poaching is a gentle cooking method, perfect for seafood, as it gives fish lots of moisture without masking its delicate flavor. Using a fish poacher makes poaching easier, as the rack allows you to pull the fish out of the hot liquid in one beautiful piece, while the poacher's shape allows you to use a minimum of liquid.

Making the court bouillon:

The traditional poaching liquid for fish, court bouillon is a broth made from simmering aromatic vegetables and herbs in water or stock, with the addition of lemon juice, vinegar or white wine.

1 onion, peeled and chopped
2 carrots, peeled and sliced 1/2" thick
1 stalk celery, sliced 1/2" thick
4 sprigs parsley
3 sprigs thyme
1 bay leaf
2 T coarse salt
10 whole peppercorns
1 cup white wine or 1/2 cup white wine vinegar or 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2 quarts water, vegetable or chicken stock (unsalted or low sodium)

Place all ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer uncovered 30 minutes. Strain and cool. Refrigerate up to 3 days. Can be frozen up to 3 months.

Poaching the fish:

Use any firm-fleshed fish. Wipe the poacher rack with a little cooking oil to prevent the fish from sticking. Clean the fish. Leave head and tail on if desired. (See How to Clean and Fillet a Fish for more information on this step.)

Place the fish on the rack and set the rack in the bottom of the poacher. Ladle enough cooled court bouillon over fish to completely cover. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook the fish gently until done, 8 to 12 minutes. Check for doneness by making a small knife cut in the middle of the fish, parallel to the backbone. The flesh should pull away from the bone and no longer be translucent. When done, remove fish from poacher, allowing liquid to drain off. Remove the skin by cutting through it at the base of the head and peel down to the tail. Turn fish onto a serving platter and peel the skin off that side. Fish is now ready to serve. Horseradish Relish makes a wonderful compliment.

Recipe: How to cook a turkey

|October 9, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen
 
There is nothing like a golden brown turkey that is moist, juicy and full of flavor in every bite. Nothing is worse than a bland, burnt and tasteless bird!

Before cooking your turkey, read the thread “How to clean a turkey”.

When planning your meal, allow approximately 1 to 1 ½ lbs. uncooked turkey per person.

For ROASTING:
For a simple roasted turkey, you can begin with brining to add flavor, keep your bird moist and tender.

Clean your defrosted turkey.

Make your brine:

In large, non-reactive container** (plastic, glass or stainless steel), add:
2 cups table salt
2 gallons cold water
Stir until salt dissolves.
Place turkey in container and place in refrigerator for 6 hours.

**Make sure the container is large enough to submerge the whole turkey.

Additional notes on brining: You can add sugar if you want – equal parts sugar and salt, stirring well to dissolve before placing the turkey in the brine. Some use honey or maple syrup in place of sugar. You can also add herbs and seasonings, if desired.

NOTE: Do not brine kosher or self-basting turkey. They are pre-treated in such a way that no additional salt is needed.

When ready to cook, removed turkey from brine and discard brine. Thoroughly rinse entire bird, inside and out using cold water; rinse for several minutes; pat dry with paper towels.

Use a large V-rack that fits into your roasting pan; cover rack with foil and poke holes to allow the heat to circulate.

Chop one onion, 3 carrots, 3 stalks of celery; toss with thyme and place in roasting pan. This is a great way to add flavor to your pan drippings for making gravy. Pour a cup of water or chicken bouillon in the bottom of the roasting pan.
Melt 6 tablespoons butter and brush over dried turkey; brush entire bird and place breast down in V-rack. Place in preheated oven and cook for 45 minutes.
Remove from oven and brush back and legs with pan drippings.
Cook an additional 45 minutes.
Brush entire surface with drippings again.
Cook another 30 minutes.
Continue this process until your bird is cooked – a meat thermometer should read 165* F. for the breast and 175* f., for the thigh.
Let rest 20 minutes before carving.

Stuff your bird the safe way
The USDA warns that cooking with stuffing can increase the chances of contracting a foodborne illness.

NOTE: If you bird is pre-stuffed DO NOT THAW BEFORE COOKING. ALWAYS COOK DIRECTLY FROM ITS FROZEN STATE.

Do NOT use fresh stuffing if you plan on grilling, smoking, frying or microwaving the turkey.

Do not combine stuffing ingredients for your stuffing ahead of time and refrigerate. Prepare everything immediately before you stuff the bird.

Do not overstuff. Stuffing expands while cooking so keep it loosely packed. Try to stick to the ratio of ¾ cup stuffing per pound of meat. Cook at 325* F.

NOTE: Cooking overnight at a lower temperature is not sufficient to keep bacteria from thriving. And stuffing should reach an internal temperature of at least 165* F. before turning off the heat.

For SMOKING:
Smoking a turkey add a warm, moist flavor and does not take any longer than traditional roasting. You can use a water-based method or smoke directly on the BBQ grill.

First of all, brine your turkey as described above to add moisture. It’s your choice if you want to use the direct heat method or the indirect heat method. Remember to replenish wood chips frequently. Do NOT stuff turkey that is being smoked.

Smoke turkey until done – breast meat should register 165* F. and thigh meat should register 175* F. on the meat thermometer.

OVEN SMOKED TURKEY

1 (10 to 12 pound) turkey
1/2 cup seasoned salt
1/4 cup fresh ground black pepper
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
4 tablespoons liquid smoke
Vegetable oil

Grease a large brown paper grocery bag with vegetable oil and set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Wash the turkey and pat dry with a paper towel. Combine 1/4 cup of vegetable oil, seasoned salt, garlic powder, liquid smoke and black pepper and mix together to make a paste. Rub the turkey well with the paste, inside and out. Place the turkey in the greased bag and tie the bag closed with a piece of string. Place on a baking sheet and roast 3 1/2 hours. Remove from the oven and let stand at room temperature for at least 30 minutes before untying the bag and removing the turkey.

Two-Stage Roast Turkey with Southwestern Honey-Pepper Rub

* 3 sticks unsalted butter
* 2 tablespoons freshly ground pepper
* 1/2 cup ground cumin
* 4 tablespoons dried oregano
* 1 tablespoon chili powder
* 1 tablespoon garlic powder
* 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
* Pinch of ground cloves
* 2 teaspoons salt
* 1/4 cup honey
* 1 (14 pound) turkey, well chilled

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

2. Prepare the rub: Melt the butter in a small saucepan. Pour butter into a large mixing bowl. Add pepper, cumin, oregano (pulverizing it with your fingers), chili powder, garlic powder, cinnamon, clove, and salt, mixing well. Drizzle in the honey and blend well.

3. Rub mixture all over the cold turkey?both on and under the skin, as evenly as possible. Place the turkey on a rack in a roasting pan in the lower portion of the oven, legs toward the back. Roast until the turkey starts to turn golden, about 15 to 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to 325 degrees and roast the turkey for about 1 1/2 hours, basting with the pan juices every 20 minutes or so. (The white meat is done when a quick-read thermometer reaches 150 degrees.)
4. Remove turkey from oven and (at table, if desired), remove the large breast fillet from each side of the turkey. Let the fillets rest a few minutes before carving into slices. Serve white meat with Cilantro-Poblano Cream Sauce.

5. Meanwhile, return the rest of the bird to the 325-degree oven. Cook until the dark meat reaches 175 degrees, about 20 minutes more. Remove, let rest a few minutes, and serve the dark meat with Smoky Chipotle-Mushroom Gravy.

Recipe: Okay – back to the pantry – Making Brown Sugar!

|September 21, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

As you read my recipes you find ** after the ingredients noting that you can save money and make this item yourself or when in a pinch and you've run out or if it is something you only use on occasion and wish not to purchase to waste the rest of it – which is very understandable with the price of everything today!

So it's time to get busy and make some of your own brown sugar.


There is really no effort involved – it's so easy.

 

Place 1 cup of granulated sugar into a bowl.

Measure in 1 tablespoon molasses.

Work the molasses into the sugar using a fork until thoroughly incorporated.


For making light brown sugar – use light molasses and
for making dark brown sugar – use dark molasses.  Don't want to buy dark brown molasses?  Add more light molasses to make dark brown sugar.


Make as much as you need – no waste for those that use it rarely.