Archive for the 'Holidays' Category

Recipe: Making Homemade Extracts

|November 20, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

 I received so many requests for this information – and I wish you would have contacted me sooner for these.

You may not be able to make all these before this holiday season – but if you are a baker – you will find that you can still make them now and you will then have them throughout the year.

By now, you know I am a "homemade" person – and I find that by making my own flavored extracts that my baked goods always have a better taste.  Did you ever buy a bottle of peppermint extract and have a really lousy taste in your finished product?  Fresh is always better.  You will have better results.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tired of paying high prices (which continually keep going up while the bottle sizes get smaller!) for your extracts and flavorings?

Of you are an "occasional" or "seasonal" baker that only pulls out the flour one or twice a year you probably don't mind paying for an extract. You may even share a bottle with others that don't bake as much. Not in my house. I need my extracts. And I have to watch my "inventory" of my homemade extracts, oils, flavored sugars, etc. to make sure I always have them on hand.

Save money – DIY! It's simple, it's easy, it's flavorful – and it's cheaper! More bang for your buck.

I don't add sugar to my citrus extracts – some do – it's your choice. The sugar is not needed as far as I am concerned.

Also – I feel that using colored bottles is better – keeps the sun out – which will effect your extracts/flavorings.

Be sure to sterilize your bottles and caps!

Opt for colored glass bottles when you can. Store out of sunlight in your pantry/cupboard.

Happy extract making!

 

How to Make Anise Extract

This takes a good three months to make – but it is worth it. and so simple!

Fill a small (half-pint) sterilized jar with whole star of anise. Carefully pour vodka over until it reaches the top. Cap. Store in pantry, shaking once a week for 3 months. If you want your anise flavoring to have a stronger flavor – allow to sit for 4 months before using.

When ready to use, strain into a clean, sterile jar, cap and store in your pantry.

 

How to Make Cinnamon Extract

Some will use a light rum – but I use my 80 proof vodka.

Break a couple cinnamon stick into a clean, sterilized jar;.

Pour 8 oz. vodka over sticks; cover; place in pantry.

Shake daily for 2 weeks.

When you have the flavor you are looking for, remove the cinnamon sticks. The longer they are in the jar, the stronger it will be, and you don't want it too overpowering.

Store in pantry.

 

How to Make Coconut Extract

1 coconut

1 1/2 ounces freshly grated coconut, approximately 1/3 cup

4 ounces vodka – 40 proof – some use 80 proof

To open a coconut: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Place the coconut onto a folded towel set down in a large bowl. Find the 3 eyes on 1 end of the coconut and using a nail or screwdriver and hammer or meat mallet, hammer holes into 2 of the eyes. Turn the coconut upside down over a container and drain the water from the coconut.

Store the water in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Place coconut on baking pan and bake in the oven for 15 minutes. Remove from oven. (The coconut should have cracked in several places.) Using an oyster knife or other dull blade, separate the hard shell from the brown husk. Using a serrated vegetable peeler, peel the brown husk from the coconut meat. Rinse the coconut meat under cool water and pat dry. Break the meat into 2 to 3-inch pieces. With the grater disk attached to a food processor, grate the coconut.

Place 1 1/2 ounces of coconut into a 1-cup glass jar with lid (sterilized) and pour vodka over it. Seal and shake to combine. Place in a cool dark place for 5 to 7 days, shaking to combine every day. Strain coconut and discard. Return vodka to a clean (sterilized) jar or to its original bottle and store in a cool place for up to a year. Reserve the remaining coconut for another use.

 

How to Make Lemon Extract

the zest from 1 – 2 lemons (wash and dry the lemon well, remove zest – no pith)

4 oz. vodka – 40 proof – some use 80 proof

1 teaspoon sugar – totally optional

Combine sugar and vodka in small stainless or glass saucepan and warm (do not boil) to dissolve sugar. Transfer to sterile jar; add lemon zest. Cap tightly and shake.

Place in pantry – shake daily. In a month you will have your extract.

NOTE: If not using sugar – place vodka and lemon zest in sterile bottle; cap; shake and proceed as above.

 

How to Make Orange Extract

the zest from 1 – 2 oranges (wash and dry the oranges well, remove zest – no pith)

4 oz. vodka – 40 proof – some use 80 proof

1 teaspoon sugar – totally optional

Combine sugar and vodka in small stainless or glass saucepan and warm (do not boil) to dissolve sugar. Transfer to sterile jar; add orange zest. Cap tightly and shake. (Make sure your strips of zest are completely immersed.)

Place in pantry – shake daily. In a month you will have your extract.

NOTE: If not using sugar – place vodka and orange zest in sterile bottle; cap; shake and proceed as above.

 

How to Make Lime Extract

the zest from 2 – 4 limes (wash and dry the limes well, remove zest – no pith)

4 oz. vodka – 40 proof – some use 80 proof

1 teaspoon sugar – totally optional

Combine sugar and vodka in small stainless or glass saucepan and warm (do not boil) to dissolve sugar. Transfer to sterile jar; add lime zest. Cap tightly and shake. (Make sure your strips of zest are completely immersed.)

Place in pantry – shake daily. In a month you will have your extract.

NOTE: If not using sugar – place vodka and lime zest in sterile bottle; cap; shake and proceed as above.

 

How to Make Grapefruit Extract

the zest from 1 – 2 grapefruit (wash and dry the grapefruit well, remove zest – no pith)

4 oz. vodka – 40 proof – some use 80 proof

1 teaspoon sugar – totally optional

Combine sugar and vodka in small stainless or glass saucepan and warm (do not boil) to dissolve sugar. Transfer to sterile jar; add grapefruit zest. Cap tightly and shake. (Make sure your strips of zest are completely immersed.)

Place in pantry – shake daily. In a month you will have your extract.

NOTE: If not using sugar – place vodka and grapefruit zest in sterile bottle; cap; shake and proceed as above.

 

How to Make Almond Extract

4 oz. almonds, peeled and blanched

2 cups vodka

Process almonds in food processor until fine – like raw sugar not white sugar.

Transfer to sterilized 1-quart glass jar; pour in vodka; cap tightly; store in pantry. Shake daily for 6 weeks.

After 6 weeks, straner through a coffee filter and transfer to small (sterilized) jars. Cap.

Takes time to make – but will keep indefinitely.

 

How to Make Vanilla Essence

This is more of a vanilla flavoring than an extract – milder – not as flavorful.

For this, I use vodka – some will use brandy, rum, gin, cognac or brandy – which to me changes the flavor completely and will effect the outcome of your baked goods. Vodka has the perfect flavor for true extracts.

3 vanilla beans, split to within 1/4-inch of each end

8 oz. 80 proof vodka

Place vanilla beans in sterilized glass jar and cover with vodka. Place in pantry; shake occasionally and let set for 2 months before using.

NOTE: ALSO – WHICH TO ME THIS IS IMPORTANT – since vanilla beans come in two different grades (A and B), I prefer to use the B grade. Grade B vanilla beans.


Grade B beans have less water weight. You get more bean for your buck because you're not paying for water. This also means that less water ends up in your extract.

With Grade A you pay for appearance, which doesn't matter.

We get the same beans as Grade A, but at a fraction of the cost.

 

How to Make Vanilla Extract

This is more flavorful than vanilla essense.

For this, I use vodka – some will use brandy, rum, gin, cognac or brandy – which to me changes the flavor completely and will effect the outcome of your baked goods. Vodka has the perfect flavor for true extracts.

6 vanilla beans, split to within 1/4-inch of each end (some remove the seeds, some don't)

8 oz. 80 proof vodka

Place vanilla beans in sterilized glass jar and cover with vodka. Place in pantry; shake occasionally and let set for 2 months before using.

NOTE: ALSO – WHICH TO ME THIS IS IMPORTANT – since vanilla beans come in two different grades (A and B), I prefer to use the B grade. Grade B vanilla beans.


Grade B beans have less water weight. You get more bean for your buck because you're not paying for water. This also means that less water ends up in your extract.

With Grade A you pay for appearance, which doesn't matter.

We get the same beans as Grade A, but at a fraction of the cost.

 

How to Make Peppermint Extract

This uses dried peppermint leaves.

Chop 1/4 cup peppermint leaves in your food processor or use a mortar and pestle. Transfer to sterilized glass jar.

Add 4 oz. vodka and 4 oz. filtered water. Cap and shake.

Store in pantry for 2 weeks before using. Remember to shake daily.

When ready to use, strain and transfer to clean, sterilized bottles; cap; store in pantry. Discard used leaves.

 

How to Make Peppermint Extract

This is for those that grow their own peppermint.

Clean (wash) your fresh cut peppermint springs. You will want to "bruise" them a bit with your fingers for the flavor. Place in sterile glass jar. About 5 or 6 small sprigs work well with 6 oz. vodka (3/4 cup). Be sure to cover the springs with the vodka. Cap and store in pantry.

After 2 weeks you wil have a mild peppermint flavor. Once it is the strength you want, strain and discard the sprigs of peppermint. Store in pantry.

 

So it's time to visit your local liquor store and stock up on 80 proof vodka!

Enjoy!

 

Recipe: Italian Traditions

|November 8, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

All Soul’s Day

November 2nd is ALL SOUL’S DAY – also know as the “Day of the Dead” – it is the day following All Saint’s Day.

All Soul’s Day is a Roman Catholic Holiday – a day of remembrance for those that have passed on. There are church services and festivals in honor those that have died.

In Italy, they begin selling special cookies starting before November. Ossa dei morti – known as bones of the dead – are cookies that are flavored with cloves (Sicilian), and from other areas they may use almonds, some using hazelnuts. These sweets are to meant to bring cheer, compensating for the sadness of All Saint’s Day and All Soul’s Day.

Different regions in Italy have different recipes:

And may I remind you – these are what Italian babies teethe on!

These are made with cornmeal:

Bring 2 quarts water to a rolling boil; sift in (about) 1 pound cornmeal, stirring constantly, until you have the consistency of soft mashed potatoes. Stop adding cornmeal at that point. Keep stirring. When done, let it rest a couple hours.

When ready to make the cookies: Whip it, adding salt and pepper (a good dose of pepper); work in wheat flour (a good handful) to give it a good consistency; remove dough from pot.

Form into breadsticks – wider in the middle and tapered at the ends. Place on lightly floured baking sheets. Bake in preheated 360* F. oven until hard and cracked – you’ll see fine cracks.

In some regions, bones of the dead are made from risen bread dough, that has butter and oil added to it, as well as sugar and anise seed. These can also be sweetened with honey. When using bread dough, shape into sticks shaped like fingers. These get baked twice. The first time for 10 to 15 minutes (depending on size), cooled and baked again.

You can also find these cookies made with sweet wine, spices, dried fruits, chocolate and pignoli.

Peel and grind ½ lb. almonds until they are half the size of a grain of rice, adding ½ cup sugar as grinding. Add 1 cup flour; work in 2 tablespoons butter and one large egg. Flavor with some lemon zest, or orange zest, or vanilla along with enough sweet liqueur to make a soft dough. Break dough into pieces the size of a fava bean, brush with egg yolk and place on floured baking sheet. Bake at 375* F. until done. Because of their size they bake quickly.

When Carmella made hers:

Cup* flour, half cup sugar, some pine nuts, blanched, peeled and finely chopped almonds**, lemon zest from half a lemon, cinnamon, and a shot glass of grappa. Pull off small pieces, roll and shape with floured hands, place on greased and floured baking sheets, brush with beaten egg, and bake at 350* F. until done.

**be careful not to grind to the point that the oils come out of the almonds

*Carmella didn’t own measuring cups – she used a cup from the dish set. Just like we all did in the family. No measuring cups, no measuring spoons. Our measuring cups were our tea cups, our measuring spoons are our teaspoons and dessertspoons from our silverware. I still use my hands to measure – it’s easier and it hasn’t failed me yet. I was raised to bake and cook by look and feel.

Like I said – every region has their own recipes for these – there are no set rules – it’s the thought that counts.

Recipe: ITALIAN FRIED DOUGH WITH HONEY

|November 8, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

One of gramma's favorites –

 
Well – not only was it one of her favorites but everyone in the family looked forward to these!

ITALIAN FRIED DOUGH WITH HONEY

These are to die for!!

In saucepan, boil 1 c. wine, 1 c. oil and ½ c. water; remove from heat; let cool.  Add 1 T. cinnamon, 1 T. ground cloves, 1 T. vanilla, grated rind of one orange; mix well.

Add enough flour to make a stiff dough; knead well; cover with bowl and let rest for 30 minutes.

Roll and cut into strips.
Place strips in hot lard (oil); fry; drain.

Heat honey with ground cloves; place fried strips in honey mixture; remove and sprinkle with hundred thousands.

Recipe: Christmas cookie recipes

|October 9, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

 

 
At this time of the year with us being so busy, I' quite sure that sharing some Christmas cookie recipes would be welcomed!

If you are looking for a special recipe – just drop me a line – and I will go through all my recipes for you.

HAPPY BAKING!

These are very good and easy to make – also, great at any time of the year!

Amish Sugar Cookies

1 cup sugar
1 cup powdered sugar
1 cup butter or margarine
1 cup cooking oil
2 eggs
4 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 teaspoon vanilla

Preheat oven to 375* F.

Combine sugars, butter and oil, beat well. Add eggs and mix well. Add flour, baking powder, baking soda, cream of tartar and vanilla. Cover with plastic wrap and put in the refrigerator overnight. Make into small balls and flatten slightly with a fork. Bake in preheated oven for 10-12 minutes. Do not over cook.

Recipe: Butternut Balls

|October 9, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

1 cup butter
1/4 cup sugar
2 cups flour
1 tablespoon vanilla
1 1/2 cups mashed pecans (or walnuts)
powdered sugar

Preheat oven to 300* F.

Cream butter thoroughly. Add remaining ingredients except powdered sugar. Roll into balls about walnut size. Place on ungreased cookie sheet for 35 minutes preheated oven. Roll in powdered sugar immediately and cool on waxed paper. (Cookies may be made in advance and frozen.)

Recipe: Ginger Balls

|October 9, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

These cookies are absolutely perfect for the holiday season.

I've watched many stand by the cookie platter just popping them in – one right after the other!

Preheat oven to 375* F.

Beat on low speed until well blended:
1 cup butter (not margarine), softened
1 1/2 cup sugar
1 large egg
2 tablespoons dark corn syrup (yes, at times I've used light)
1/2 cup mild molasses

Gradually beat in:
3 cups flour
2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon salt

Have a small bowl of granulated sugar on hand for rolling cookies in – about 1/4 cup

Roll into 1 1/2-inch balls; roll in sugar bowl to coat. Place on ungreased cookie sheets about 2-inches apart. Bake in preheated oven for 12 to 14 minutes. transfer to wire rack to cool about 2 minutes after removing from oven.

Store air tight.

Recipe: Some really good cookie recipes

|October 9, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

These are a few recipes I shared on my blog back in December 2010 –

This recipe is great for those that need to make cookies for a cookie exchange – or just big batch baking!

I hope you give this a try –

Basic Butter Cookie Dough Recipe with Variations

4 sticks (1 pound) salted butter, softened
1 1/3 cups granulated sugar
3 large egg yolks
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
4 2/3 cups all-purpose flour

Step 1: In a large bowl, with an electric mixer set on medium-high speed beat together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy.
Step 2: Beat in egg yolks, one at a time.
Step 3: Beat in vanilla extract.
Step 4: Beat in flour gradually until just combined.

Makes enough dough to do two of the listed recipes below.

This dough can be wrapped and refrigerated for up to 48 hours before using. You can also freeze this dough about 3 weeks ahead of time.

Whenever working with butter dough if it should become to soft and sticky, just place it in the freezer for a few minutes until firm again.

Raspberry Hazelnut Triangles

1/2 prepared basic butter cookie dough
1/3 cup seedless raspberry jam
1/2 cup finely chopped hazelnuts

Step 1: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Step 2: Roll out dough between two sheets of wax paper into an approximately 14-inch square, about 1/8 inch thick.
Step 3: Remove top sheet of wax paper and spread raspberry jam across dough.
Step 4: Sprinkle with chopped hazelnuts.
Step 5: With a knife, cut dough into 2-inch squares, and halve each square diagonally to form triangles.
Step 6: Arrange triangles 1/2 inch part on ungreased cookie sheets.
Step 7: Bake for 12 minutes or until lightly golden. Let cookies remain on sheets for 5 minutes before transferring to a cooling surface.

Makes 96 cookies.

Chocolate Dipped Coconut Sticks

2 1/2 cups sweetened flaked coconut, toasted golden and cooled
1/2 prepared basic butter cookie dough, at room temperature
2 cups semisweet chocolate chips

Step 1: In a large bowl, mix butter dough and coconut until just combined.
Step 2: Halve dough and on 2 pieces of waxed paper pat into 11 x 2 1/2-inch rectangles. Chill dough wrapped in wax paper for about 30 minutes or until firm.
Step 3: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Step 4: Working with one rectangle of dough at a time, cut dough crosswise into 1/4-inch slices.
Step 5: Arrange slices 1 inch apart on ungreased cookie sheets. With a sharp knife halve each slice lengthwise forming sticks; separating them slightly with knife.
Step 6: Bake for 12 minutes or until slightly golden. Leave cookies on sheets for 2 minutes before transferring to a cooling surface.
Step 7: In a medium microwave safe bowl, melt chocolate on medium-high setting until smooth.
Step 8: Gently dip one end of stick into bowl, wiping off excess on rim. Reheat chocolate occasionally if needed to keep thin. Place sticks on wax paper to cool.

Makes about 15 dozen cookies.

Orange Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies

1 cup dried cranberries
3/4 cup old fashion rolled oats
1 1/2 teaspoons grated orange peel
1/2 prepared basic butter cookie dough, at room temperature
About 1/2 cup granulated sugar

Step 1: In a medium bowl, soak cranberries for 15 minutes in war water. Drain and chop fine; set aside.
Step 2: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Step 3: In a large bowl, beat cranberries, pats and grated orange peel into basic butter dough until just combined.
Step 4: Place 1/2 cup of granulated sugar in small bowl. Form dough into 1-inch balls and roll in sugar to coat. Arrange balls 2 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheets. Flatten each ball with drinking glass with bottom wrapped in wax paper to prevent sticking.
Step 5: Bake for 12 minutes or until lightly golden. Transfer cookies to cooling surface.
Makes 7 dozen cookies.

Spiced Icebox Butter Cookies

1/2 prepared basic butter cookie dough, room temperature
3 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 1/2 teaspoons anise seeds, crushed lightly
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Icing:
1 cup powdered sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice

Step 1: In a large bowl, with an electric mixer combine all cookie ingredients.
Step 2: Halve dough and on sheets of wax paper form each half into 12-inch log. Chill logs, wrapped in wax paper at least 2 hours or overnight.
Step 3: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Step 4: With sharp knife cut logs into 1/8-inch slices and arrange 1/2-inch apart on an ungreased cookie sheet.
Step 5: Bake for 12 minutes or until lightly golden brown. Transfer cookies to cooling surface.

Icing:
Step 1: In a small bowl, whisk together icing ingredients and transfer to a sealable plastic bag. With scissors cut a 1/8-inch opening in corner of bag.
Step 2: Drizzle each cookie with icing and let set to dry.

Makes about 10 dozen cookies.

Recipe: How to cook a turkey

|October 9, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen
 
There is nothing like a golden brown turkey that is moist, juicy and full of flavor in every bite. Nothing is worse than a bland, burnt and tasteless bird!

Before cooking your turkey, read the thread “How to clean a turkey”.

When planning your meal, allow approximately 1 to 1 ½ lbs. uncooked turkey per person.

For ROASTING:
For a simple roasted turkey, you can begin with brining to add flavor, keep your bird moist and tender.

Clean your defrosted turkey.

Make your brine:

In large, non-reactive container** (plastic, glass or stainless steel), add:
2 cups table salt
2 gallons cold water
Stir until salt dissolves.
Place turkey in container and place in refrigerator for 6 hours.

**Make sure the container is large enough to submerge the whole turkey.

Additional notes on brining: You can add sugar if you want – equal parts sugar and salt, stirring well to dissolve before placing the turkey in the brine. Some use honey or maple syrup in place of sugar. You can also add herbs and seasonings, if desired.

NOTE: Do not brine kosher or self-basting turkey. They are pre-treated in such a way that no additional salt is needed.

When ready to cook, removed turkey from brine and discard brine. Thoroughly rinse entire bird, inside and out using cold water; rinse for several minutes; pat dry with paper towels.

Use a large V-rack that fits into your roasting pan; cover rack with foil and poke holes to allow the heat to circulate.

Chop one onion, 3 carrots, 3 stalks of celery; toss with thyme and place in roasting pan. This is a great way to add flavor to your pan drippings for making gravy. Pour a cup of water or chicken bouillon in the bottom of the roasting pan.
Melt 6 tablespoons butter and brush over dried turkey; brush entire bird and place breast down in V-rack. Place in preheated oven and cook for 45 minutes.
Remove from oven and brush back and legs with pan drippings.
Cook an additional 45 minutes.
Brush entire surface with drippings again.
Cook another 30 minutes.
Continue this process until your bird is cooked – a meat thermometer should read 165* F. for the breast and 175* f., for the thigh.
Let rest 20 minutes before carving.

Stuff your bird the safe way
The USDA warns that cooking with stuffing can increase the chances of contracting a foodborne illness.

NOTE: If you bird is pre-stuffed DO NOT THAW BEFORE COOKING. ALWAYS COOK DIRECTLY FROM ITS FROZEN STATE.

Do NOT use fresh stuffing if you plan on grilling, smoking, frying or microwaving the turkey.

Do not combine stuffing ingredients for your stuffing ahead of time and refrigerate. Prepare everything immediately before you stuff the bird.

Do not overstuff. Stuffing expands while cooking so keep it loosely packed. Try to stick to the ratio of ¾ cup stuffing per pound of meat. Cook at 325* F.

NOTE: Cooking overnight at a lower temperature is not sufficient to keep bacteria from thriving. And stuffing should reach an internal temperature of at least 165* F. before turning off the heat.

For SMOKING:
Smoking a turkey add a warm, moist flavor and does not take any longer than traditional roasting. You can use a water-based method or smoke directly on the BBQ grill.

First of all, brine your turkey as described above to add moisture. It’s your choice if you want to use the direct heat method or the indirect heat method. Remember to replenish wood chips frequently. Do NOT stuff turkey that is being smoked.

Smoke turkey until done – breast meat should register 165* F. and thigh meat should register 175* F. on the meat thermometer.

OVEN SMOKED TURKEY

1 (10 to 12 pound) turkey
1/2 cup seasoned salt
1/4 cup fresh ground black pepper
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
4 tablespoons liquid smoke
Vegetable oil

Grease a large brown paper grocery bag with vegetable oil and set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Wash the turkey and pat dry with a paper towel. Combine 1/4 cup of vegetable oil, seasoned salt, garlic powder, liquid smoke and black pepper and mix together to make a paste. Rub the turkey well with the paste, inside and out. Place the turkey in the greased bag and tie the bag closed with a piece of string. Place on a baking sheet and roast 3 1/2 hours. Remove from the oven and let stand at room temperature for at least 30 minutes before untying the bag and removing the turkey.

Two-Stage Roast Turkey with Southwestern Honey-Pepper Rub

* 3 sticks unsalted butter
* 2 tablespoons freshly ground pepper
* 1/2 cup ground cumin
* 4 tablespoons dried oregano
* 1 tablespoon chili powder
* 1 tablespoon garlic powder
* 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
* Pinch of ground cloves
* 2 teaspoons salt
* 1/4 cup honey
* 1 (14 pound) turkey, well chilled

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

2. Prepare the rub: Melt the butter in a small saucepan. Pour butter into a large mixing bowl. Add pepper, cumin, oregano (pulverizing it with your fingers), chili powder, garlic powder, cinnamon, clove, and salt, mixing well. Drizzle in the honey and blend well.

3. Rub mixture all over the cold turkey?both on and under the skin, as evenly as possible. Place the turkey on a rack in a roasting pan in the lower portion of the oven, legs toward the back. Roast until the turkey starts to turn golden, about 15 to 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to 325 degrees and roast the turkey for about 1 1/2 hours, basting with the pan juices every 20 minutes or so. (The white meat is done when a quick-read thermometer reaches 150 degrees.)
4. Remove turkey from oven and (at table, if desired), remove the large breast fillet from each side of the turkey. Let the fillets rest a few minutes before carving into slices. Serve white meat with Cilantro-Poblano Cream Sauce.

5. Meanwhile, return the rest of the bird to the 325-degree oven. Cook until the dark meat reaches 175 degrees, about 20 minutes more. Remove, let rest a few minutes, and serve the dark meat with Smoky Chipotle-Mushroom Gravy.

Recipe: The weekend before Thanksgiving –

|September 24, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

just a typical weekend before –

 
It's like the calm before the storm.

Hurricane Mama!

This is the weekend before Thanksgiving and there is so much to do. Not just preparing a great meal – but at this time I'm doing curtains and windows so they will be done for the holidays. I am a clean freak – so scrubbing the house is just normally done in this house.

So today I've got the laundry going, so far I've got all the windows done and I've got to iron the last of the curtains and hang them. Just waiting for them to dry a bit more.

With that done – and I've danced around the house with the vacuum, doing all the baseboards and furniture as well, and I've polished the furniture and washed all the knick knacks and lamps. The doors and doorways are done, the cupboards are done. So I have a little time to breathe.

Then scrub the floors – and with that done – I get a break.

I've done all my shopping – so the only thing I'll need to get at the store is milk, lettuce and tomatoes. And believe me – I'll make sure I am the first in and out of the store when I do get them. I really do not like crowds.

With a ton of recipes I'd like to post to Recipes by Ingredient (one of my other blogs) I'd like to be able to collapse in front of my computer and share them all.

and on that note – I think I best get finished so I can play later…………..

Recipe: an incorrectly published pie recipe

|September 24, 2011|read comments (0)
Author: Mama's Kitchen

I am posting this once again – for those that may be recipe hoarders and never really take the time to read the recipe through until it is time to make it –

 

Okay – it's Sunday morning and we all look forward to enjoying the Sunday paper, reading ads, looking at sale papers and at this time of the year, we check out the recipes that are including in the coupon sections that they hand out with the paper.

Of course I am drawn to the recipes –

sure as shootin'

take a look at this recipe:

Pumpkin Apple Pie

Yield:
8 servings Prep Time:
10 minutes Bake Time:
50-55 minutes Chill Time:
2 hours

1/4 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
1 egg
1/4 teaspoon Karo® Corn Syrup OR Karo® Lite Syrup
1 cup canned pumpkin
1 can (5 fluid ounces) evaporated milk

1 can (21 ounces) Comstock® or Wilderness® Apple Pie Filling

1 (9-inch) unbaked deep dish pie crust

MIX sugar, salt and pumpkin pie spice in a bowl. Add egg and beat slightly. Add syrup, pumpkin and evaporated milk; blend well.

SPREAD apple pie filling in pie crust. Gently pour pumpkin filling over the apples.

BAKE in a 425°F preheated oven for 15 minutes; reduce oven temperature to 350°F and continue baking for 35 to 40 minutes, or until knife inserted in pie center comes out clean.

CHILL a minimum of 2 hours before serving.

WHHHAAATTTTTT???

Am I THAT old that I don't understand this recipe?

Or do they need to find an editor that is not blind and knows something about baking pies?

Or is it me?

Did you read this recipe? Please take a look –

What am I looking at?

1/4 TEASPOON Karo syrup

????????????

If their Classic Pumpkin Pie has 1/2 cup sugar and 1/2 cup Karo syrup in the ingredient list, why is this 1/4 cup sugar and 1/4 TEASPOON Karo syrup – shouldn't it read 1/4 CUP???

To me – that cannot be right. So I called their customer service, which of course is closed today and I cannot call again until tomorrow – 9 to 4 Central time.

I honestly can't wait to hear their response on this one!

Do you realize – if this is incorrect – how many will follow that recipe because it is a Brand Name recipe and those that write them are supposed to put out correct recipes? Not only was it in the coupon section printed that way, but it is also on their site.

I know I am old(er), and I know I've been 'round the kitchen a few times (better than being 'round the block a few times!) but in all my years of baking – I have NEVER seen 1/4 TEASPOON of Karo in a pie recipe! Why use it to begin with at that measurement!!!!

Maybe it's me – but I will know tomorrow and I will edit this post and let you know what they say…………..

 

UPDATE –

I just got off the phone with customer service (they really appreciate me calling – NOT!) – the recipe was incorrectly printed in the paper and on their site. The customer service rep (what a way to start her day – with me – and thousands of other calls for the same reason) assured me that it WAS corrected on the site – as of our conversation – it wasn't – and I told her that it needed to be changed (she insisted it WAS corrected – until she checked and saw it for herself – but she was told they changed it). (Their proof-reader needs glasses!)

This is the correct recipe – and I was right – 1/4 cup not 1/4 teaspoon Karo syrup:

Pumpkin Apple Pie

Yield:
8 servings Prep Time:
10 minutes Bake Time:
50-55 minutes Chill Time:
2 hours

1/4 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
1 egg
1/4 cup Karo® Corn Syrup OR Karo® Lite Syrup
1 cup canned pumpkin
1 can (5 fluid ounces) evaporated milk

1 can (21 ounces) Comstock® or Wilderness® Apple Pie Filling

1 (9-inch) unbaked deep dish pie crust

MIX sugar, salt and pumpkin pie spice in a bowl. Add egg and beat slightly. Add syrup, pumpkin and evaporated milk; blend well.

SPREAD apple pie filling in pie crust. Gently pour pumpkin filling over the apples.

BAKE in a 425°F preheated oven for 15 minutes; reduce oven temperature to 350°F and continue baking for 35 to 40 minutes, or until knife inserted in pie center comes out clean.

CHILL a minimum of 2 hours before serving.

So the recipe is supposed to be corrected on their site – and for those that are going to follow the recipe from the newspaper – oh well – Karo is not reprinting it for them.